Editor Update: James R. Gapinski named a finalist for Glimmer Train’s “Very Short Fiction Award”

James R. Gapinski’s story, “Migratory Patterns,” was one of 25 finalists for Glimmer Train‘s recent “Very Short Fiction Award.”

Read the full list of winners and finalists here.

Editor Update: Hillary Leftwich published in Monkeybicycle

Hillary Leftwich’s story, “A Small Infestation Following a Big Stroke of Luck,” was recently published in Monkeybicycle.  Congrats on the publication, Hillary!

Her work has also recently appeared recently in NANO Fiction and is forthcoming in Progenitor.  Follow Hillary on Twitter at @hillaryleftwich.

Tom Howard is the 2014 Innovative Short Fiction Contest winner!

The 2014 Innovative Short Fiction contest has ended, and Manuel Gonzales has selected the winner.  Congratulations to Tom Howard and his short story, “American Rag Story.”  This year’s judge, Manuel Gonzales, noted that this piece was “funny and tragic and formally interesting,” and he also liked that “it didn’t take itself too seriously.”  Tom Howard’s work has appeared recently in ARDOR, Storm Cellar, Quarter After Eight, Digital Americana and elsewhere. He lives with his wife in Arlington, Virginia.  Tom will receive a $500 prize, and his story will be published in the next issue of The Conium Review, due out later in 2014.

This year’s finalists were Amy Blakemore, Jack Granath, D. V. Klenak, Jan LaPerle, and Christine Texeira.  Honorable mentions include Colleen Burner, Julie Curwin, Will Kaufman, and Kendall Klym.

The Conium Review editorial staff thanks everybody who submitted and supported this contest.  We look forward to announcing next year’s judge soon, and we hope many of you will consider submitting again in 2015.

theNewerYork at AWP

Come support theNewerYork at the 2014 AWP conference.

Joshua S. Raab (editor of theNewerYork) will be on a panel organized by The Conium Review on Feb. 27th, from 3:00 to 4:15 in Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3, Room 301.

Josh is also on another panel “Don’t Just Stand There and Read: Literary Events That Go Beyond the Usual,” Feb. 27th, from 12:00 to 1:15 in the Washington State Convention Center, Level 6, Room 613/614.

You can also find theNewerYork at booth 1604 throughout the bookfair.

Lastly, theNewerYork is putting on a literary carnival on Feb. 28th, sponsored by Submittable!  Join the writers and editors of theNewerYork from 6:00pm to 8:00pm at Caffe Umbria, 320 Occidental Ave. S.  Readers/performers include John Mortara, Kevin Sampsell, Rose McAleese, Eric Lloyd Blix, Christopher Morgan, Mollie Boutell, Kayla Pongrac, John J. Rause, Eric Howerton, and Margaret Eaton.  Get more details on Facebook.

We’ll be there.  Will you?

The Conium Review welcomes two new editors

We’re pleased to welcome two new staff members to The Conium Review: Hillary Leftwich and Adam Padgett.

Hillary Leftwich lives in Denver, CO.  She holds an MA in Creative Writing from Regis University, and she’s co-founder of the “Denver Shitty Writers” group.  She was recently interviewed by The Missouri Review for their “Working Writer Series.”  You can follow her on Twitter or read her WordPress blog.

Adam Padgett was a contributor to The Conium Review‘s Spring 2013 issue. His fiction has also appeared in Appalachian Heritage, Santa Clara Review, Cold Mountain Review, SmokeLong Quarterly, and elsewhere. He is a mentor for PEN America’s Prison Writing Program, and he teaches writing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.  You can follow Adam on Twitter.

Interview with Kim Brown, editor of “Minerva Rising”

Kim Brown

Kim Brown

Kim Brown is an editor at Minerva Rising Literary Journal. Her work has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Today’s Chicago Woman, Contemporary Fashion, National View, Naperville Sun, and Pitkin Review.



[James R. Gapinski]: Many writers and editors have seen the VIDA.org statistics that show low lit journal acceptance rates for women, but few actually do anything about it. What motivated you to take action, creating a women’s-only journal?

[Kim Brown]: I read somewhere that stories written by women were “small” compared to the ones written by men. That troubled me. It seemed to devalue the work of women writers and the overall experience of being a woman. But after receiving a series of rejection letters for own work, I worried that there might be some truth to that statement. I lamented to anyone who would listen that there needed to be a literary journal for women that was interested in publishing the type of stories that women write.  And then I remembered a quote by Toni Morrison, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”  I knew I had to create the type of journal I wanted to submit to.

 [JRG]: In March 2014, you’ll give the first “Owl of Minerva” award. Can you talk a little bit about the award and the criteria you’ll be looking for in nominees?

[KB]: It has always been Minerva Rising‘s policy to give a portion of our proceeds back to women in need. In the past we have done this by donating to Women for Women International. However, we felt that we wanted to make more of an impact and the Owl Award was born. We wanted to offer one woman writer, who would otherwise not have the financial means to invest in herself as a writer, an opportunity to pursue her creative endeavors. Applicants will be required to write an essay in response to a question posted on our website. We will be looking for both need and desire.   

[JRG]: You say you created the sort of journal you’d want to submit to. Can you expand on that?  What are some of the aesthetic or creative approaches that best fit your style?

[KB]: I tend to write anecdotal tales of ordinary women working through the challenges of daily life. A lot of the journals I submitted to were looking for shock and awe.  And while I appreciate that type of writing, I wanted a place that felt like a community of women supporting one another through the sharing of experiences and stories.

Consequently, when people ask about the aesthetic or creative approaches that best fit my style, I shudder a little. The beauty and meaning I find in writing comes from the writer’s courage and the determination to share her truth. The style or the approach isn’t as important to me. I want to get lost in the story. 

[JRG]: You referenced Toni Morrison earlier.  What other authors have had a major impact on your work as a writer and editor?

[KB]: There have been ten women writers in particular who have guided me throughout my journey as a writer: Natalie Goldberg, Anne Lamott, Anna Quindlen, Kate Chopin, Bebe Moore Campbell, Dorothy West, Judy Blume, Virginia Woolf, Joyce Carol Oates, and Sylvia Path

I’ve learned so much by the way each author writes about the complexity of life as a woman and/or writer. I owe every woman on the list a ton of gratitude.

[JRG]: As a fellow graduate of Goddard’s MFA program, I bet you heard the phrase “trust the process” a lot.  I know this can be a big question, but what’s your process as a writer?

[KB]: Free writing plays a huge part in my process. I like to write long hand for a designated period of time or a set number of pages before I start to work on a specific piece. I use that time to clear my head and set the intention for my day.  Sometimes I use my free writing to work out questions or problems that I have with my current project.  There is something about actually writing on paper that primes the pump for me. Then I move to my computer to write. I prefer to work in two hour blocks. But I’m a procrastinator, so I often have to work longer to get things done when I’m under a deadline.

[JRG]: What about as an editor?  Can you give a little insight into the editorial process at Minerva Rising?

 [KB]: As an editor, I really prefer to read paper.  When we first started Minerva Rising, I would print out every submission and read it. I’d make little notes in the margins, much like an annotation. I taught various writing classes at a small liberal arts college several years ago.  Consequently, I read submissions like I was grading papers.  However, as we started to grow, this became an inefficient use of resources and time. Now I read submissions on a Kindle and take notes in a notebook.  I write down my impressions of the piece and whether or not it works for the current issue.  I like to be specific so that we can offer feedback to the writer. The other editors may have a different process, but we all share our thoughts and notes on the piece after we have voted. This is really helpful because it gives us something to discuss as we make our final decisions.

Check out the lit mag “From Sac”

Check out From Sac, a collective of Sacramento Valley writers. The Executive Editor is Jon Alston (he was also a contributor to our Spring 2013 issue). The journal is open to submissions year-round. You can find out more details here: http://www.fromsac.com/

And check out Jon Alston’s blog here: http://jaawriter.blogspot.com/

The Conium Review needs a few new editors

We’re looking for a few new Fiction Editors and Poetry Editors to join The Conium Review staff. All staff positions are on a volunteer basis. You can apply from any location; all the reading is done on a computer. We’re only looking for a handful of new people, so get your application in early before the positions fill up!

If you’re interested, please submit your information through our online form: http://www.coniumreview.com/join-our-staff.html