Book Review: Three Ways of the Saw

Three Ways of the Saw
Written by Matt Mullins
Atticus Books, 2012
ISBN 9780983208068

You know things are going to take a bad turn when a co-worker arrives at the company picnic with a pair of ATVs in tow. Three Ways of the Saw is, after all, a collection of short fiction in which nothing ever goes right for any of its protagonists. In the story in question, tellingly titled “The Braid,” all is going a little too well for a pair of would-be young lovers when the ATVs arrive like the second coming of Chekhov’s gun.

The carnage that ensues is gruesome and gut wrenching, but it also serves a larger purpose. Where a lesser writer might simply offer gore for the sake of gore, author Matt Mullins uses the opportunity to comment subtly and even sensitively upon the nature of adult relationships. Such relationships can be wonderful, he insists on every page of this collection, so full of potential, but also terrifyingly fragile.

Three Ways of the SawFor the most part, the stories in Three Ways of the Saw offer up characters who run the gamut from being adrift to circling the drain. There’s the boy who struggles with questions about his own sexuality in one story and watches his parents’ relationship crumble before his eyes on a road trip through the Great American West in another. There’s the creepy voyeur who trades places with his dog in order to get to know his shapely new neighbor. There’s the girl dreading the arrival of her first period as she reluctantly embarks upon a canoe trip led by an officious priest.

There are drunks, stoners, thieves, and ne’er-do-wells lurking in every corner of this collection, yet for all of the dead-ends they encounter, Mullins always offers his characters as well as his readers a ray of hope. We are, according to Three Ways of the Saw, a curious species—one wracked with all manner of pain, but also one capable of enduring it.

Review by Marc Schuster
© 2012, All Rights Reserved

Announcing the Guest Editor for Vol. 2, No. 1

We’ve selected Marc Schuster as Guest Editor for Vol. 2, No. 1 of The Conium Review, due out in early 2013.  Marc is the author of two novels: The Grievers (The Permanent Press, 2012) and The Singular Exploits of Wonder Mom and Party Girl (The Permanent Press, 2011).  And Marc teaches writing and literature courses at Montgomery County Community College in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania.

You can submit to our next issue here: http://www.coniumreview.com/general-poetryfiction.html

And you can learn more about our new Guest Editor at his website.

“The Conium Review” is Looking for a Guest Editor

Vol. 1, No. 2 is almost completely wrapped up, and it’ll ship to bookstores and subscribers in July!  This means that Ian Chung has completed his stint as Guest Editor.  We’re conducting our search for the next Guest Editor now; if you’d like to work on an issue on The Conium Review, please visit this link for more details.

http://www.coniumreview.com/call-for-guest-editors.html