Editor Update: James R. Gapinski named a finalist for Glimmer Train’s “Very Short Fiction Award”

James R. Gapinski’s story, “Migratory Patterns,” was one of 25 finalists for Glimmer Train‘s recent “Very Short Fiction Award.”

Read the full list of winners and finalists here.

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Two of our editors will be reading during AWP

Susan Lynch (our Associate Editor) and James R. Gapinski (our Managing Editor) will be reading at an off-site even during the AWP conference in Seattle, WA.

Lit.mustest: “I Saw Them When…”

Third Place Books, 6504 20th Ave NE Seattle, WA 98115

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

7:00pm to 9:30pm

Third Place Books in Ravenna and the Lit.mustest reading series present an evening with award-winning and recently published students and alumni from Goddard College’s MFA in Creative Writing program.

Other readers include Shelly Weathers, Jeff Eisenbrey, Sarah Kishpaugh, Kim Mayer, Rachel Serrit, Isla McKenna, and Samantha Kolber.

The Conium Review panel at AWP

The Conium Review‘s Managing Editor, James R. Gapinski, will be on a panel at this year’s AWP conference in Seattle, WA.

“Let’s Avoid a Quick Death, Please: Starting and Sustaining a New Literary Publication”

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

3:00pm to 4:15pm

This panel explores the process of starting and sustaining a new literary publication. Countless small presses and journals launch every year only to die after a couple issues. Let’s talk with some people who avoided that fate. This panel will discuss how to choose the right publishing medium, secure funding, attract readers, and deal with unexpected hurdles.

The panelists include Matt Muth (representing Pacifica), Stefanie Torres (representing Beecher’s), Joshua S. Raab (representing theNewerYork) and James R. Gapinski (representing The Conium Review).

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke moderates.

 

 

James R. Gapinski’s work forthcoming in Leodegraunce’s anthology

leodegraunceJames R. Gapinski has two pieces, “The Woman Who Eats Bees” and “Backyard Pawn Shop,” scheduled to appear in Leodegraunce‘s upcoming flash fiction anthology.  The anthology is slated for early 2014.

James R. Gapinski is Managing Editor of The Conium Review.

“The Conium Review” on a panel at AWP’s 2014 Conference

Vol2 No2The Conium Review‘s Managing Editor, James R. Gapinski, will be on a panel at the 2014 AWP conference in Seattle, WA.  The panel is entitled “Let’s Avoid a Quick Death, Please: Starting and Sustaining a New Literary Publication.” It’s on Thursday, February 27th at 3:00 in the Western New England MFA Annex, room 301.

The other panelists include Stephanie Torres of Beecher’s Joshua S. Raab of theNewerYork, and Matt Muth of Pacifica Literary Review.

Independent publication is on the rise, spurring a small press renaissance. But starting a literary publication isn’t as easy as it sounds. The panelists represent relatively new journals that are successfully gaining readership and attracting attention.

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke moderates the session; she is a 2013 Jack Straw writer, and she teaches writing at Seattle Central Community College.

Here’s the panel description from the AWP schedule:

This panel explores the process of starting and sustaining a new literary publication. Countless small presses and journals launch every year only to die after a couple issues. Let’s talk with some people who avoided that fate. This panel will discuss how to choose the right publishing medium, secure funding, attract readers, and deal with unexpected hurdles.

If you’re attending AWP this year, please stop on by!

Upcoming Workshops from Conium Press Editors

James R. Gapinski and Susan Lynch will be teaching courses through Mt. Hood Community College’s continuing education department this fall.  Each of these fun, community-based workshops are just $29 for the entire eight-week course, and the are open to writers of all skill levels.  Whether you want to write the next great book, or tinker with writing as a hobby, these workshops can help you grow as an author.

James’ short fiction course is offered through the Portland campus, and Susan’s poetry course is housed at the Gresham campus.  Details for either course are found on The Conium Review’s website or through Mt. Hood Community College.  Feel free to e-mail with any questions about these upcoming workshops.

Chapbook Review: The Snipe

The Snipe
Written by Matthew Derby
JR Vansant, 2010

The SnipeMatthew Derby’s The Snipe is a relatively short publication (28 pages—although that’s not-too-short considering it’s a chapbook), so here’s a relatively short review.  The chapbook tackles issues of infidelity, jealously, and the sprinkles of self-delusion that often accompany these themes.  The chapbook is a funny piece of work—light at first, gradually becoming dark humor later on.  And even as the principal character begins to enact revenge fantasies against a woman in her friend-circle, Derby keeps you laughing with musings on gender constructs—recalling a shopkeeper’s crack about her buying “the pink rifle as well as the pink magazine loaded with punk bullets that looked like glossy lipstick,” it’s noted that “at that moment she wanted nothing more than to fall into step with the legions of ladies who had come to the armory in search of pink rifles.  She imagined herself at a shooting range with the ladies, all of them standing in a perfect row, taking aim at the paper targets in unison” (22).I won’t spoil the climax of The Snipe, nor will I uncover the tangled mess of emotions that run through Derby’s characters, suffice to say that the “mess” comes into focus by the end.  It’s a chapbook with a sense of purpose that sharpens as its narrative arc progresses—providing social commentary alongside the lighter notes.  If the chapbook has a failing, I’d suggest that the reliance upon gender stereotypes to make its points doesn’t seem to work in a couple of situations—even as Derby obliterates others instances of stereotyping throughout the chapbook.  The juxtaposition of generalization and authenticity stops short of heightening the chapbook’s subtle ironies.  Regardless, potential sticking points are nominal, and Matthew Derby’s The Snipe is a fun romp that deserves a read.  The signed and numbered copies of this chapbook are sold out, but you can still order a copy of the second printing through JR Vansant’s website.
Review by James R. Gapinski
© 2012, All Rights Reserved

Release Reading on July 23rd in Portland, Oregon

On July 23rd, there will be a release reading for Vol. 1, No. 2 of The Conium Review in Portland, Oregon.  Find out details and invite your friends on the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/412373975480804/

For this reading, visiting writers Jasmine Cronin and Maya West share their work.  Local readers include Douglas Allen, Thor Benson, and Nancy MacLaren.  James R. Gapinski and Susan Lynch also read selections from The Conium Review‘s second issue.  Come get a taste of the new issue, hear some travelogues, enjoy some poetry, and share in the celebration as we launch Volume 1, Number 2 of The Conium Review.

Journal Review: Eunoia Review

Eunoia Review

Eunoia Review provides a twist on the usual electronic literary publication.  This website doesn’t serialize its offerings; instead, two new pieces of writing are posted every day.  As such, I can’t offer a review of a specific Eunoia Review issue or volume.  The entire publication is one long, continuous edition.  What I can offer, is an overview of the publication concept and a cursory review of the site’s literary work.This is hardly the first time the “story-a-day” or “poem-a-day” concept has been utilized, but this website stands apart from imitators (or forerunners) through its timely, well-organized editor.  Ian Chung is the architect of this project, and he provides a sleek site without the constant self-promotional clutter of some projects run by a single editor.  He isn’t doing this for recognition or propagation; Ian Chung just wants to read, review, and perhaps publish your writing.  In his 2011 Duotrope interview, Chung says that on most days, he checks for new submissions right after rolling out of bed.  This guy is dedicated.

The editor of this project genuinely wants to read your writing; he cares, he’s interested in craft, and he’s busting his ass to put out new work every day.  This makes Eonioa Review very approachable.  Duotrope’s submission tracker reports just over a 50% acceptance ratio as of November 21, 2011.  Among the Eunoia Review archives, there are hundreds of excellent literary works.  However, a several published pieces could use polish here and there, but that’s okay because Chung’s publication gives new authors a fighting chance.  I’m not going to beat down a journal that has so many good vibes coming from its concept, editor, and writers.  Chung’s approachability and speedy response times to most submissions make this electronic publication is the ideal market for any emerging author.

Eunoia Review’s wide tent is perfect for almost anyone.  Beginners and seasoned hands will find an inviting atmosphere around the site and its cordial editor.  Additionally, avid readers will revel in its daily approach to publishing.  Each time you slide open that laptop lid, you are greeted by two new daily poems or stories. It’s a good concept, and it comes together seamlessly at Eunoia Review.

Review by James R. Gapinski
© 2011, All Rights Reserved