The Conium Review’s website will be down for a couple days

Our website will be down for a couple days.  We’ve performing some major updates, shifting web hosts, and generally spicin’ things up around here.

The blog will remain active through most of the upgrade, but the main site (including our store) will be down.  If you have questions about the journal, submissions, or purchases, you can always e-mail us at editors@coniumreview.com

Thanks for understanding!

Contributor Update: Thomas Dodson’s work forthcoming in The Chicago Quarterly Review

Thomas Dodson’s “The Death of Elpenor” will appear in the next issue of The Chicago Quarterly Review.

Additionally, the magazine Tom edits, Printer’s Devil Review, has just released a new issue.  You can find the latest PDR here.

Congrats on the upcoming publication and on putting out another issue of Printer’s Devil Review!

Check out Beecher’s at AWP

During AWP, Stefanie Torres will represent Beecher’s on a panel organized by The Conium Review.  And you can find Beecher’s elsewhere during the conference.

Stop by booth V13 to say “hi” to Beecher’s editors.

Be sure to stop by the University of Kansas & Beecher’s Reading March 1st, from 9:00am to 10:15am on the Robert Muroff Bookfair Stage, Washington State Convention Center, Level 4.  Readers include Katie Savage, Kelly Barth, Anne Royston, and Mary Stone Dockery.

theNewerYork at AWP

Come support theNewerYork at the 2014 AWP conference.

Joshua S. Raab (editor of theNewerYork) will be on a panel organized by The Conium Review on Feb. 27th, from 3:00 to 4:15 in Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3, Room 301.

Josh is also on another panel “Don’t Just Stand There and Read: Literary Events That Go Beyond the Usual,” Feb. 27th, from 12:00 to 1:15 in the Washington State Convention Center, Level 6, Room 613/614.

You can also find theNewerYork at booth 1604 throughout the bookfair.

Lastly, theNewerYork is putting on a literary carnival on Feb. 28th, sponsored by Submittable!  Join the writers and editors of theNewerYork from 6:00pm to 8:00pm at Caffe Umbria, 320 Occidental Ave. S.  Readers/performers include John Mortara, Kevin Sampsell, Rose McAleese, Eric Lloyd Blix, Christopher Morgan, Mollie Boutell, Kayla Pongrac, John J. Rause, Eric Howerton, and Margaret Eaton.  Get more details on Facebook.

We’ll be there.  Will you?

Manuel Gonzales reading at AWP

Manuel Gonzales (author of The Miniature Wife and the judge for The Conium Review‘s Innovative Short Fiction Contest) will be reading at a Riverhead Books event during AWP.

Room 618/619/620, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
Saturday, March 1, 2014
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Since its founding, Riverhead Books has published the freshest, most memorable and diverse new voices in literary fiction. Riverhead authors have won Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Critics Circle Awards, Story Prizes, and been named to Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists, the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35, and the New Yorker’s 20 Under 40, among many other distinctions. Four of Riverhead’s acclaimed writers will read and discuss their work with Riverhead’s director of publicity.
The other readers are Nami Mun (author of Miles from Nowhere), Danielle Evans (author of Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self), and The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost).
Jynne Dilling Martin moderates this session.

Two of our editors will be reading during AWP

Susan Lynch (our Associate Editor) and James R. Gapinski (our Managing Editor) will be reading at an off-site even during the AWP conference in Seattle, WA.

Lit.mustest: “I Saw Them When…”

Third Place Books, 6504 20th Ave NE Seattle, WA 98115

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

7:00pm to 9:30pm

Third Place Books in Ravenna and the Lit.mustest reading series present an evening with award-winning and recently published students and alumni from Goddard College’s MFA in Creative Writing program.

Other readers include Shelly Weathers, Jeff Eisenbrey, Sarah Kishpaugh, Kim Mayer, Rachel Serrit, Isla McKenna, and Samantha Kolber.

The Conium Review panel at AWP

The Conium Review‘s Managing Editor, James R. Gapinski, will be on a panel at this year’s AWP conference in Seattle, WA.

“Let’s Avoid a Quick Death, Please: Starting and Sustaining a New Literary Publication”

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

3:00pm to 4:15pm

This panel explores the process of starting and sustaining a new literary publication. Countless small presses and journals launch every year only to die after a couple issues. Let’s talk with some people who avoided that fate. This panel will discuss how to choose the right publishing medium, secure funding, attract readers, and deal with unexpected hurdles.

The panelists include Matt Muth (representing Pacifica), Stefanie Torres (representing Beecher’s), Joshua S. Raab (representing theNewerYork) and James R. Gapinski (representing The Conium Review).

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke moderates.

 

 

Interview with Kim Brown, editor of “Minerva Rising”

Kim Brown

Kim Brown

Kim Brown is an editor at Minerva Rising Literary Journal. Her work has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Today’s Chicago Woman, Contemporary Fashion, National View, Naperville Sun, and Pitkin Review.



[James R. Gapinski]: Many writers and editors have seen the VIDA.org statistics that show low lit journal acceptance rates for women, but few actually do anything about it. What motivated you to take action, creating a women’s-only journal?

[Kim Brown]: I read somewhere that stories written by women were “small” compared to the ones written by men. That troubled me. It seemed to devalue the work of women writers and the overall experience of being a woman. But after receiving a series of rejection letters for own work, I worried that there might be some truth to that statement. I lamented to anyone who would listen that there needed to be a literary journal for women that was interested in publishing the type of stories that women write.  And then I remembered a quote by Toni Morrison, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”  I knew I had to create the type of journal I wanted to submit to.

 [JRG]: In March 2014, you’ll give the first “Owl of Minerva” award. Can you talk a little bit about the award and the criteria you’ll be looking for in nominees?

[KB]: It has always been Minerva Rising‘s policy to give a portion of our proceeds back to women in need. In the past we have done this by donating to Women for Women International. However, we felt that we wanted to make more of an impact and the Owl Award was born. We wanted to offer one woman writer, who would otherwise not have the financial means to invest in herself as a writer, an opportunity to pursue her creative endeavors. Applicants will be required to write an essay in response to a question posted on our website. We will be looking for both need and desire.   

[JRG]: You say you created the sort of journal you’d want to submit to. Can you expand on that?  What are some of the aesthetic or creative approaches that best fit your style?

[KB]: I tend to write anecdotal tales of ordinary women working through the challenges of daily life. A lot of the journals I submitted to were looking for shock and awe.  And while I appreciate that type of writing, I wanted a place that felt like a community of women supporting one another through the sharing of experiences and stories.

Consequently, when people ask about the aesthetic or creative approaches that best fit my style, I shudder a little. The beauty and meaning I find in writing comes from the writer’s courage and the determination to share her truth. The style or the approach isn’t as important to me. I want to get lost in the story. 

[JRG]: You referenced Toni Morrison earlier.  What other authors have had a major impact on your work as a writer and editor?

[KB]: There have been ten women writers in particular who have guided me throughout my journey as a writer: Natalie Goldberg, Anne Lamott, Anna Quindlen, Kate Chopin, Bebe Moore Campbell, Dorothy West, Judy Blume, Virginia Woolf, Joyce Carol Oates, and Sylvia Path

I’ve learned so much by the way each author writes about the complexity of life as a woman and/or writer. I owe every woman on the list a ton of gratitude.

[JRG]: As a fellow graduate of Goddard’s MFA program, I bet you heard the phrase “trust the process” a lot.  I know this can be a big question, but what’s your process as a writer?

[KB]: Free writing plays a huge part in my process. I like to write long hand for a designated period of time or a set number of pages before I start to work on a specific piece. I use that time to clear my head and set the intention for my day.  Sometimes I use my free writing to work out questions or problems that I have with my current project.  There is something about actually writing on paper that primes the pump for me. Then I move to my computer to write. I prefer to work in two hour blocks. But I’m a procrastinator, so I often have to work longer to get things done when I’m under a deadline.

[JRG]: What about as an editor?  Can you give a little insight into the editorial process at Minerva Rising?

 [KB]: As an editor, I really prefer to read paper.  When we first started Minerva Rising, I would print out every submission and read it. I’d make little notes in the margins, much like an annotation. I taught various writing classes at a small liberal arts college several years ago.  Consequently, I read submissions like I was grading papers.  However, as we started to grow, this became an inefficient use of resources and time. Now I read submissions on a Kindle and take notes in a notebook.  I write down my impressions of the piece and whether or not it works for the current issue.  I like to be specific so that we can offer feedback to the writer. The other editors may have a different process, but we all share our thoughts and notes on the piece after we have voted. This is really helpful because it gives us something to discuss as we make our final decisions.

Editor Update: Susan Lynch’s poetry published in Elohi Gadugi

Our Associate Editor, Susan Lynch, has two poems in the Winter 2014 issue of Elohi Gadugi: “The Halcyon” and “It Can Happen Just Like That.”

Congratulations on the recent publication, Susan!