Come follow us at The Conium Review Online Compendium

This particular WordPress blog has been dormant for a while, but all the content has been moved to our main site.  We recently changed our website and added WordPress.org functionality to it.  Our WordPress.com (dot-com, not dot-org) will be deleted soon.  Please follow the migrated blog if you want to keep receiving our posts.

You can find The Conium Review Online Compendium at http://coniumreview.com/online/

This site contains all our normal blog content, but it serves as a venue for online publication too.  Over the past few weeks, we’ve been posting new flash fiction to the site.  See what we’ve been up to, take a look at our upcoming print edition, and consider submitting to our Flash Fiction Contest ($300 prize, judged by Ashley Farmer).

We hope to see you at the new blog!

Editor Update: Hillary Leftwich published in Monkeybicycle

Hillary Leftwich’s story, “A Small Infestation Following a Big Stroke of Luck,” was recently published in Monkeybicycle.  Congrats on the publication, Hillary!

Her work has also recently appeared recently in NANO Fiction and is forthcoming in Progenitor.  Follow Hillary on Twitter at @hillaryleftwich.

Contributor Update: Thomas Dodson’s work forthcoming in The Chicago Quarterly Review

Thomas Dodson’s “The Death of Elpenor” will appear in the next issue of The Chicago Quarterly Review.

Additionally, the magazine Tom edits, Printer’s Devil Review, has just released a new issue.  You can find the latest PDR here.

Congrats on the upcoming publication and on putting out another issue of Printer’s Devil Review!

Book Review: Glossolalia

Glossolalia: New & Selected Stories

Written by David Jauss

Press 53, 2013

ISBN 9781935708841

With prose that is precise and devastating, David Jauss presents seventeen new and selected stories about the resilience of people as they are dragged through the rough of isolation: isolation from God; isolation from love; from community. And in that isolation is discovery. Jauss builds and cultivates these immensely complex characters while never abandoning them completely. It seems to me that Glossolalia asks the question: what keeps these characters moving after taking nearly everything away?

Glossolalia_CoverIn the last twelve months, I have not read many new short story collections. Novels seem to have taken over my bookshelf, and so consequently, I really forgot why I fell in love with the short form those years ago. It was the surprises, the gut-punch that you never saw coming and left you forgetting how to breathe, only to start the next gut-punch pages later. Stories that ended far sooner than you wish they had, and Glossolalia lands every blow with stories that challenge the form, stretch the narrative bounds, while also committing to honest and more traditional storytelling.

David Jauss has no limitations. “Apotheosis” is a story written in letter-form, by Friar Miguel Sabogal during the Spanish Inquisition, pleading his innocence on the charge of being a heretic. In the letter, the friar recounts his story about torture and the fragility of the spirit as it is reduced to its fewest possible components. “The Bigs” is a story about a baseball player from the Dominican Republic playing for a Double A team. The story is written in first person and in a dialect that lends such authenticity to the narrative voice that the reader can nearly hear it. The title story, “Glossolalia,” is a much more straightforward narrative that shows what happens when a boy’s father has a complete mental breakdown. Jauss’ great attention to nuance is what really sells these stories: the nuance of voice, the nuance of character. Young fiction writers should read this collection and learn from one of the truly great masters of the form, and the casual reader should simply allow these stories to blow them away.

There seems to be a reoccurring theme throughout the collection of bad fathers, broken fathers. Stories about fatherly faith gained and lost and then found again. What Jauss achieves with this collection is a brutal realism, the hard callous that insulates us within our darkest dreams and our deepest regrets. But ultimately these stories remind the reader of the amazing resilience of people, of how “a life could break so utterly, then mend itself.”

Review by Adam Padgett

© 2014, All Rights Reserved

Contributor Update: Lauren Hall published in Cleaver Magazine

Lauren Hall recently had two prose poems, “The Miser” and “Possum,” published in Cleaver Magazine.

Lauren was a contributor to our first issue.  Her work has also appeared in NANO FictionEunoia ReviewApiary, and Fiction Writers Review.   She also received the 2012 William Carlos Williams Prize for Poetry at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Conium Review panel at AWP

The Conium Review‘s Managing Editor, James R. Gapinski, will be on a panel at this year’s AWP conference in Seattle, WA.

“Let’s Avoid a Quick Death, Please: Starting and Sustaining a New Literary Publication”

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

3:00pm to 4:15pm

This panel explores the process of starting and sustaining a new literary publication. Countless small presses and journals launch every year only to die after a couple issues. Let’s talk with some people who avoided that fate. This panel will discuss how to choose the right publishing medium, secure funding, attract readers, and deal with unexpected hurdles.

The panelists include Matt Muth (representing Pacifica), Stefanie Torres (representing Beecher’s), Joshua S. Raab (representing theNewerYork) and James R. Gapinski (representing The Conium Review).

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke moderates.

 

 

Editor Update: Hillary Leftwich’s work is forthcoming in Nano Fiction

Hillary Leftwich‘s flash fiction piece, “Runt,” was recently accepted for publication in Nano Fiction (Vol. 7, No. 2).  Look for the issue later this year.

Hillary is a Fiction Editor for The Conium Review.  She holds an MA in Creative Writing from Regis University, she’s the co-founder of the Denver Shitty Writers group, and shew as recently interviewed by The Missouri Review for their Working Writer Series.

Natalie Peeterse’s chapbook selected for an Artist’s Innovation Award

Natalie Peeterse’s chapbook Black Birds : Blue Horse, An Elegy (Goldline Press, 2012), was selected for an Artist’s Innovation Award from the Montana Arts Council.
Our Associate Editor, Tristan Beach, reviewed Natalie’s chapbook in 2012. We also published Natalie’s poem, “Sonora” in our latest issue, and the poem was nominated for a Pushcart Prize last December.
We’re proud to have published Natalie’s work, and congratulate her on this recent award from the Montana Arts Council.
Artist's Innovation Award

Check out the lit mag “From Sac”

Check out From Sac, a collective of Sacramento Valley writers. The Executive Editor is Jon Alston (he was also a contributor to our Spring 2013 issue). The journal is open to submissions year-round. You can find out more details here: http://www.fromsac.com/

And check out Jon Alston’s blog here: http://jaawriter.blogspot.com/

Call for Fiction and Poetry Submissions: The Conium Review

The Conium Review is currently open for fiction and poetry submissions.  Submit between January 1st and April 1st, 2014 using our Submittable page.

We publish innovative writing from new and established authors.  There are no line limits or length restrictions.  Simultaneous submissions are okay.  Find the full guidelines on the Submittable page or on our website.