Editor Update: James R. Gapinski named a finalist for Glimmer Train’s “Very Short Fiction Award”

James R. Gapinski’s story, “Migratory Patterns,” was one of 25 finalists for Glimmer Train‘s recent “Very Short Fiction Award.”

Read the full list of winners and finalists here.

Contributor Update: Thomas Dodson’s work forthcoming in The Chicago Quarterly Review

Thomas Dodson’s “The Death of Elpenor” will appear in the next issue of The Chicago Quarterly Review.

Additionally, the magazine Tom edits, Printer’s Devil Review, has just released a new issue.  You can find the latest PDR here.

Congrats on the upcoming publication and on putting out another issue of Printer’s Devil Review!

Book Review: Glossolalia

Glossolalia: New & Selected Stories

Written by David Jauss

Press 53, 2013

ISBN 9781935708841

With prose that is precise and devastating, David Jauss presents seventeen new and selected stories about the resilience of people as they are dragged through the rough of isolation: isolation from God; isolation from love; from community. And in that isolation is discovery. Jauss builds and cultivates these immensely complex characters while never abandoning them completely. It seems to me that Glossolalia asks the question: what keeps these characters moving after taking nearly everything away?

Glossolalia_CoverIn the last twelve months, I have not read many new short story collections. Novels seem to have taken over my bookshelf, and so consequently, I really forgot why I fell in love with the short form those years ago. It was the surprises, the gut-punch that you never saw coming and left you forgetting how to breathe, only to start the next gut-punch pages later. Stories that ended far sooner than you wish they had, and Glossolalia lands every blow with stories that challenge the form, stretch the narrative bounds, while also committing to honest and more traditional storytelling.

David Jauss has no limitations. “Apotheosis” is a story written in letter-form, by Friar Miguel Sabogal during the Spanish Inquisition, pleading his innocence on the charge of being a heretic. In the letter, the friar recounts his story about torture and the fragility of the spirit as it is reduced to its fewest possible components. “The Bigs” is a story about a baseball player from the Dominican Republic playing for a Double A team. The story is written in first person and in a dialect that lends such authenticity to the narrative voice that the reader can nearly hear it. The title story, “Glossolalia,” is a much more straightforward narrative that shows what happens when a boy’s father has a complete mental breakdown. Jauss’ great attention to nuance is what really sells these stories: the nuance of voice, the nuance of character. Young fiction writers should read this collection and learn from one of the truly great masters of the form, and the casual reader should simply allow these stories to blow them away.

There seems to be a reoccurring theme throughout the collection of bad fathers, broken fathers. Stories about fatherly faith gained and lost and then found again. What Jauss achieves with this collection is a brutal realism, the hard callous that insulates us within our darkest dreams and our deepest regrets. But ultimately these stories remind the reader of the amazing resilience of people, of how “a life could break so utterly, then mend itself.”

Review by Adam Padgett

© 2014, All Rights Reserved

The Conium Review needs a few new editors

We’re looking for a few new Fiction Editors and Poetry Editors to join The Conium Review staff. All staff positions are on a volunteer basis. You can apply from any location; all the reading is done on a computer. We’re only looking for a handful of new people, so get your application in early before the positions fill up!

If you’re interested, please submit your information through our online form: http://www.coniumreview.com/join-our-staff.html

Check out our Innovative Short Fiction Contest on Facebook

The Conium Review‘s Innovative Short Fiction Contest is in full swing, and now there’s a Facebook event page so you can easily remember the deadline and invite friends to submit: https://www.facebook.com/events/568889706531007/

Please spread the word.  Every submission helps support the contest and our journal’s future publications.

Marc Schuster published in “The First Day”

Marc Schuster (Guest Editor of our Spring 2013 issue) was recently published in The First Day.  Checked out his essay, “Is Nothing Sacred?” on their website.

Other recent publications include “Form 28” in The Ampersand Review, and “Madrid” in Apiary Magazine.  He is also the author of The GrieversThe Singular Exploits of Wonder Mom and Party GirlDon DeLillo, Jean Baudrillard, and the Consumer Conundrum, and The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.

Call for Submissions: 2014 Innovative Short Fiction Contest

The Conium Review‘s Innovative Short Fiction Contest is currently open for submissions.  The contest deadline is March 15th, 2014.  The contest judge is Manuel Gonzales, author of The Miniature Wife (Riverhead Books, 2013).

The winner receives $500, publication in our journal, five copies of the print issue, and a copy of the judge’s book.  The $15 entry fee includes a free digital download of the issue.  Up to 7,500 words of flash fiction or short stories.

Innovative writing should pack a punch.  Send us your weird, wild, and wonderful.  Take risks with your draft.

Read the full guidelines and submit your work here: http://www.coniumreview.com/contests.html

One more week until the Innovative Short Fiction Contest begins

The Conium Review‘s Innovative Short Fiction Contest begins in one week.  Mark your calendars, and get your submissions ready for December 15th.  The contest guidelines are available here: http://www.coniumreview.com/contests.html

The winner receives $500, publication, copies of the issue, and a copy of the judge’s book.

William Cass wins The Examined Life Journal’s contest

One of William Cass’s stories, entitled “Empathy,” was selected as the fiction winner in The Examined Life Journal‘s recent writing contest.
William Cass  was a contributor to The Conium Review‘s Spring 2013 issue.  Congratulations on the winning story, William!